10 Kids’ Books in Honor of the 70th Anniversary of the US Development and Dropping of Atomic Bombs

Statue in honor of Sadako at the Children's Peace Monument in Hiroshima Peace Park. (Big Stock Photo)

Statue in honor of Sadako Sasaki at the Children’s Peace Monument in Hiroshima Peace Park. (Big Stock Photo)

This week marks the 70th anniversary of a momentous time for the world. On Aug. 6, 1945, the US dropped the atomic (uranium) bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. A few days later (Aug. 9), the US dropped a plutonium bomb on Nagasaki. Japan’s surrender was announced Aug. 15. The formal surrender ceremony took place on Sept. 2 (VJ Day/Victory Over Japan) on the deck of the USS Missouri, officially ending World War II.

It was one of those “best of times, worst of times.” Yes, the war was over. But the bombs brought unheard of deaths and destruction, as well as the ongoing threat of global nuclear destruction.

Here are 10 kids’ books that describe the building of the bombs and the end of the war.

Fiction:

1. Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr (1977)–MG–Based on a real girl, this story is about Sadako Sasaki, who survived the Hiroshima bombing when she was two, but succumbed to leukemia, caused by the radiation, when she was twelve. Before she died, Sadako began to make 1,000 origami cranes in hopes of getting well. After her death, Japanese children led the movement to finish Sadako’s 1,000 cranes, and to build a monument to honor Sadako, other victims of the bombing, and to promote world peace.

2. Hiroshima: A Novella by Laurence Yep (1995)–MG–Twelve-year-old Sachi and her classmates were clearing away houses to make fire lanes in Hiroshima the morning the atomic bomb obliterated her city. Sachi was the only one of her classmates to survive, but suffered from debilitating and disfiguring burns. A few years later she is chosen for treatment in the United States where she overcomes her fears of the Americans.

3. Code Talker by Joseph Bruchac (2005)–MG/YA–Ned, a young Navajo boy, is taught at his boarding school that anything Indian is bad, but when WWII starts the US military wants the Navajo to use their language to foil the Japanese. Ned joins the Marines and helps the US win the war.

4. The Gadget by Paul Zindel (2001)–MG–Thirteen-year-old Stephen joins his father at Los Alamos where his father is working on a secret project that will end the war. But, when Stephen finds his dad distant and distracted, he teams up with his new friend, Alexei, to uncover the big secret. He learns that neither The Gadget nor Alexei are what he expects.

5. The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages (2006)–MG/YA–The scientists at Los Alamos were allowed to have their families at the secret base. The children went to school, played with friends, and learned to live with very tight security measures. Two girls–Dewey, a young math and science genius, and Suze, an artist–become unlikely friends in an unlikely place.

Non-fiction:

6. Hiroshima No Pika by Toshi Maruki (1980)–Picture Book–This book was first published in Japan and was classified as non-fiction. The story dramatizes a family’s experience during and after the bombing in Hiroshima. Although the book is based on the facts of an actual family, it seems to have fictional elements. Perhaps it would be considered historical fiction if it were published now. However, this book handles the horror of a young girl’s experience in a sensitive and truthful way that young readers can understand and handle.

7. The Ultimate Weapon: The Race to Develop the Atomic Bomb by Edward T. Sullivan (2007)–MG/YA–Sullivan thoroughly describes the development of atomic research, the building of the atomic bombs used during WWII, and the involvement of key scientists and military leaders.

8. J. Robert Oppenheimer: The Brain Behind the Bomb by Glenn Scherer and Marty Fletcher (2008)–MG/YA–This biography about Oppenheimer also describes the discovery of fission, the need for the atomic bomb, the aftermath of the bombings, as well as Oppenheimer’s efforts to keep atomic weapons from being used again.

9. The Bomb by Steve Sheinkin (2012)–MG/YA–America and Britain, with help from German and Jewish scientists and Norwegian resistance fighters, successfully raced the Nazis in building the first atomic weapons. No longer needing the bombs to beat the Nazis, the US used them against the Japanese. However, the Soviets stole many of the secrets of the bombs, and the new atomic weapon race became one between the US and the Soviets. This book explains why the security measures described in The Green Glass Sea were necessary, but unsuccessful.

10. The Secret of the Manhattan Project by Doreen Gonzales (2012)–MG/YA–This book also details how scientists discovered fission, the political and human situations leading up to and continuing throughout the war, the urgency behind the U.S. creation of atomic weapons, how the weapons were used, and how the atomic age affects us now.

For more info:

US Army Center of Military History

My Scott O’Dell Award Challenge: The Green Glass Sea by Ellen Klages

What other kids books should I add to the list?

6 comments

  1. Carla Ketner

    Thanks, Debbie. I just yesterday was looking for mg novels about World War II. Two other good ones are Richard Peck’s On the Wings of Heroes and Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen. They’re not about the bomb, but they’re both great for humanizing history.

    • Deb Watley

      Thanks for the suggestions, Carla! On the Wings of Heroes is wonderful! I haven’t been brave enough to read Devil’s Arithmetic. What did you think of it? Another good, recent, middle-grade WWII book is Across a War-Tossed Sea by L.M. Elliott. What WWII kids’ books sell well in your store?

  2. Mary Louise Sanchez

    A great list to mark the 70th anniversary of the dropped atomic bomb. I would add The Secret Project Notebook by Carolyn Reeder.

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