My Scott O’Dell Award Challenge: SHADES OF GRAY by Carolyn Reeder

Scott O'Dell Award

Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction

This month’s book for My Scott O’Dell Award Challenge is the 1990 Scott O’Dell Award-winner, Shades of Gray, by Carolyn Reeder.

In this middle grade novel, set in Virginia after the conclusion of the Civil War, 12-year-old Will is the son of a Confederate officer who was killed in battle. Will has also lost the rest of his family to violence and illness and is sent to live with his aunt–and her husband who refused to fight in the war.

History lesson:

Shenandoah Valley–Some of the more well-known battles of the Civil War took place in eastern Virginia. However, some lesser-known, but important battles took place in the Shenandoah Valley in the far western part of the state.

What I previously knew about the Shenandoah Valley during the Civil War came from the Jimmy Stewart movie, Shenandoah, in which farming families suffered at the hands of both sides–Union and Confederate.

In fact, the valley was an important geographic area. The farms supplied food to the South, and the valley was an access point into the North. The two sides fought each other in the valley multiple times, with each side occupying at alternating times. Finally, in the summer and fall of 1864, Union forces went in again to retake the Valley, cut off the Confederates access into Union territory, and destroy food sources for the Confederacy.

Union General Philip Sheridan achieved all those goals, and his troops laid waste to the Shenandoah Valley.

In Shades of Gray, Will is from the city of Winchester, where there was major fighting in the 1864 campaign.

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Writing lesson:

Lack of dialect–This book is set in the post-Civil War South, and Will lives with his poor, lesser-educated relatives. Yet, because Reeder didn’t use the phonetic, heavy dialect that books such as Tom Sawyer used, her novel is very readable, especially for young readers.

However, Reeder used enough Southern vocabulary to give readers a sense of the setting, and she occasionally used either vocabulary, pronunciation, or grammar to show some of the characters had less education than others. Here are a couple examples:

“I’ll make a stew to go with the poke greens Meg cut along the road this afternoon.”

“That must smart right bad.”

For more info:

The Civil War Trust

Shenandoah Valley Battlefields

Carolyn Reeder

Join me Jan. 31 to talk about the 1996 Scott O’Dell winner, The Bomb by Theodore Taylor.

Have you read about or visited the Shenandoah Valley? Have you visited Civil War battlefields? Do you have family stories connected to the Civil War?

 

8 comments

  1. Mary Louise Sanchez

    Read the book years ago and really liked it. I love the song about the Shenandoah Valley.

    I have my great-great grandfather’s military papers when he served in the 4th army volunteer Union regiment during the Civil War in New Mexico. He fought at the Battle of Valverde.

    • Deb Watley

      I like the song, too! It has such a grand, but sad feel to it. I’m amazed at how much family history you know–what a treasure! And I know nothing about the Civil War in the Southwest, and I’d love to learn. Are there any children’s books that cover it?

  2. Tarissa

    Oh, yes! I remember reading this one a few years ago and loved it. One of my favorite children’s books that covers the Civil War. I made the rest of my family read it too. 🙂

    I like your idea of reading ALL the Scott O’Dell award winners. That would definitely be interesting!

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