Tagged: manga

Classic Stories and Manga

 

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Photo by Deb Watley

A couple of my recent reads were manga versions (in the Manga Classics series) of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlett Letter and Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.

The Scarlett Letter was adapted by Crystal S. Chan and illustrated by SunNeko Lee, and Pride and Prejudice was adapted by Stacy King and illustrated by Po Tae.

Past posts about manga:

Stretching My Reading Habits: Manga

Manga and the Emmas

Because I began¬†2017 ill, I’m now very behind. For the next couple weeks I will focus on some other writing/teaching projects, and my next blog post will be on Jan. 31.

What have you read recently?

 

 

 

Manga and the Emmas

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Two different Emmas–Photo by Deb Watley

At the beginning of the year I wrote about my “discovery” of manga because I found a book ¬†titled Emma, which I wrongly thought was a version of Jane Austen’s story.

The Emma I had found is a delightful historical fiction series set in Britain around 1900, created by Kaoru Mori. I read book one in the series, where the title character is a maid who loves a man above her station in life.

But, guess what? I recently discovered there is a manga version of Jane Austen’s Emma! This is an adaption illustrated by Po Tse and published in Udon Entertainment’s Manga Classics series.

I think manga is a wonderful way to introduce well-loved stories to readers who wouldn’t normally read classics.

Have you read any classics or old favorites in an unusual format?

Stretching My Reading Habits: Manga

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Photos by Deb Watley–Emma by Kaoru Mori

A couple of my sons enjoy reading manga and watching anime. So before Christmas I was in the manga/graphic novel aisle of a local bookstore helping one son find a present for the other.

I also found a book for me.

I’ve read comics and graphic novels before, but never manga. I was under the impression that all manga was Japanese action/adventure stories like ones my sons follow.

I was wrong.

Emma caught my eye. I suppose partly because of the soft colors. Partly because it was a hardback book surrounded by paperbacks. But, it was the name, Emma, that made me pull it off the shelf for a closer look. I think I expected it to be a graphic novel version of Jane Austen’s Emma.

Wrong again.

Emma is an original story by Kaoru Mori, a Japanese mangaka–a manga artist. It’s the story, set in England in the late 1800s, of a maid and a wealthy man who fall in love but are separated by their socio-economic classes.

So, you ask, what is manga? According to my son, manga is a Japanese graphic novel. Although anime includes any animated tv show or movie, it’s generally known as Japanese animation.

Manga, like graphic novels, is a very broad category. It’s written for young kids, teens (young adult/YA), and adults. It consists of all the literary genres: adventure, sci fi/fantasy, mystery, romance, historical fiction, contemporary, etc.

Emma is a YA historical fiction romance.

Something else that separates manga from other graphic novels? It’s read from right to left–the pages, the illustration windows, and even the speech bubbles.

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Manga stories are read from right to left, and all page turns come from the left.

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A glimpse inside

I requested and received the book for Christmas, and I read it one day last week. In fact, I stayed up late to finish it.

It was fun to read, though sometimes I had to remind myself to read from right to left. What a fun way to read historical fiction, and a good way to stretch my reading habits!

For more info:

About manga and anime

Do you read different categories or genres to stretch yourself? What was your most recent read outside of your comfort zone?